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Teaching Drama

Teaching Drama

Teaching Drama, written for teachers by teachers, practitioners and playwrights, is a unique twice-termly magazine resource for anyone involved in drama and performing arts education. 

About

Published just before the start of each term and half term for maximum benefit, Teaching Drama offers a dynamic mixture of news, features, schemes of work and in-depth reviews. It offers inspiring ideas and advice for all drama teachers, whether you're newly qualified or a head of department. The features section keeps you abreast of current debates, developments and initiatives within the drama teaching profession, as well as providing innovative ways to expand and enhance your teaching. 

Teaching Drama blog

Visit the Teaching Drama blog for our latest online news stories and updates. 

Schemes of work 

Our schemes of work section (available to Teaching Drama + subscribers online for a 12-month period) provides material you can use directly in your own teaching. Each issue contains six substantial schemes of work, covering KS2, KS3, GCSE, AS, A2, IB, BTEC and the Creative and Media Diploma. Some are specific to certain exam boards; others can be used more widely.

For downloadable SCHEMES OF WORK (including account set-up) and supporting material, please scroll to the bottom of this text, and click on the tab labelled 'schemes of work'.

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Welcome to the Teaching Drama online schemes of work. Teaching Drama�s schemes of work are an essential resource for all school drama departments as well as drama practitioners, offering easy-to-follow plans full of inspiring ideas. They cover KS2, KS3, GCSE, AS, A2, IB, BTEC and the Creative and Media Diploma, with some being specific to certain exam boards and others suitable for wider use.

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Schemes of Work

Issue 64 (Spring Term 2 - 15/16)

Key Stage 2

Roald Dahl's Fantastic Mr Fox: A look at the book through drama

Author: Helen Day

Roald Dahl's Fantastic Mr Fox: A look at the book through drama

This Roald Dahl classic abounds with characters and events to inspire the imagination, and provides wonderful source material for a drama scheme of work.

The scheme is arranged to align roughly with the chronology of the book, so it can be delivered alongside a classroom reading, or will work just as well if students have already finished the book. I use a range of drama techniques to explore the story, characters and themes within Fantastic Mr Fox, and as well as exercises that challenge, there are plenty of themed games to keep things fun.

The scheme will develop students’ speaking, group discussion and interaction skills, and is therefore in line with the Spoken Language requirements of the National Curriculum. Students will be encouraged to create and sustain roles within devised improvisations, and to respond thoughtfully to the work of others. Read less...

Key Stage 3

Galileo: A room out of time

Author: Ed Passmore

Galileo: A room out of time

This scheme of work combines science and philosophy to give students the tools to assess the world around them and think critically about what they are told, and what they experience. In this scheme, I strive to create an atmosphere where students can question what we accept as ‘the truth’ and find their own way to a deeper understanding of the world.

Having done this scheme with a wide range of age groups and abilities from Year 7 all the way up to degree-level students, I have chosen not to break the activities up into separate lessons, allowing the teacher to best gauge how to lay it out for their own students. Individual teachers will know how long certain exercises will take their classes. Read less...

Using drama to explore modern fiction

Author: Keith Burt

Using drama to explore modern fiction

With the subject of drama coming under more and more scrutiny to justify its existence in the curriculum, it is becoming increasingly important to find ways of demonstrating the subject’s status and impact on students’ learning as a whole. This scheme of work supports the English curriculum by exploring through drama a text that the students are reading and studying in their English lessons. This is a scheme of work that has been developed over time and helps to build on the students’ knowledge and understanding of a book during their drama lessons, ready for their English lessons.

Parents really love the scheme because they value anything that will help their child improve their English. SLT and English departments love the scheme too for much the same reason! The students enjoy it and it’s also fun to teach.

It doesn’t matter what the text is, as the scheme of work can easily be adapted to suit it; however it’s been used to explore Private Peaceful, Skellig, Holes, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and Al Capone Does My Shirts all without any adaptation. The scheme of work also employs Flipped Learning principles to delivering the Drama content so that more of the lesson can be given over to practical work without sacrificing the learning of Drama skills. Read less...

Key Stage 4

Exploring Beckett

Author: Ryan Williams

Exploring Beckett

This scheme of work offers GCSE students the opportunity to delve into the works of Samuel Beckett, a playwright who revolutionised theatre and challenged its typical rules and conventions. It introduces students to Beckett’s most notable works and discusses them in terms of absence, minimalism and character, while also allowing them to extend and develop their acting and directing techniques within a fun workshop format.

This unit is not attached to any particular exam board, and as such it provides a great learning opportunity for students to gain an insight into how the drama they know today was established. The series of workshops can be applied within the constraints of most chosen exam boards, or could be used as an introduction to AS level, in which most courses require a study on a particular practitioner or playwright. Read less...

Exploring Beckett

Author: Ryan Williams

Exploring Beckett

This scheme of work offers GCSE students the opportunity to delve into the works of Samuel Beckett, a playwright who revolutionised theatre and challenged its typical rules and conventions. It introduces students to Beckett’s most notable works and discusses them in terms of absence, minimalism and character, while also allowing them to extend and develop their acting and directing techniques within a fun workshop format.

This unit is not attached to any particular exam board, and as such it provides a great learning opportunity for students to gain an insight into how the drama they know today was established. The series of workshops can be applied within the constraints of most chosen exam boards, or could be used as an introduction to AS level, in which most courses require a study on a particular practitioner or playwright. Read less...

Musical Theatre Performance

Author: Gail Deal

Musical Theatre Performance

The specification for Unit 14 Musical Theatre Performance can be found at the following website address:
https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/BTEC-Nationals/Performing-Arts/2010/Specification/Unit_14_Musical_Theatre_Performance.pdf

This unit is worth 10 credits and takes 60 Guided Learning Hours to deliver. The scheme is based on 12 weeks with four hours a week of lessons and 12 hours’ worth of weekend rehearsal.

One teacher should take directorial control of the production. Staffing should include teachers with expertise in acting, dancing and singing. A singing teacher with excellent piano skills would be the most important factor when considering putting on a musical theatre production. If such a person is not available you will have to rely on backing tracks when learning the songs for the show, which is not ideal. The specification asks for a live musical accompaniment for the performances. In some schools there will be an orchestra, but if this does not exist in your school or college, you will have to consider carefully how to provide live accompaniment on the piano for the songs. Read less...

Key Stage 5

Metamorphosis by Steven Berkoff

Author: Geoff Smith

Metamorphosis by Steven Berkoff

This scheme explores, from a practical perspective, the play-text Metamorphosis by Steven Berkoff. It is designed to develop students� performance skills and deepen their understanding of the play. The exercises in this scheme follow the work of a variety of practitioners, such as Steven Berkoff and Antonin Artaud. The lessons have been specifically tailored to �Component 1: Devising� within the Edexcel A level Drama and Theatre specification (2016) and focuses on developing the students� creative and exploratory skills in preparation for creating an original performance. Read less...

Issue 63 (Spring Term 1 - 15/16)

Key Stage 2

Circo Fantastico!

Author: Andrew Williams and Geoff Smith

Circo Fantastico!

This scheme of work takes students on a magical tour in the company of one of the most influential circus directors of the 19th-century: Giuseppe Chiarini. Embarking on the journey as members of the Royal Italian Circus, the students will create and develop their characters using various characterisation techniques and become circus experts with a specialism of their choosing. They will also explore a number of key themes, as outlined in the Learning Objectives.

Using Mantle of the Expert (MoE) as a means to empower students and place them at the centre of the learning, selected resources to provide impetus or pretext, and Teacher-in-Role (TiR) or character narration to add depth and tension to the imagined enterprise, this scheme of work blends historical references to this cherished form of entertainment with a fictional storyline and as such provides flexibility to adopt alternative themes, if desired.

Learning objectives:
By the end of the scheme, students will have been immersed in a story about one of the greatest circus shows in history. With MoE at its core, the scheme develops participants’ skills in storytelling and creative writing. Using a number of stimuli (included as appendices) and a number of drama techniques, the scheme encourages critical thinking around the key themes of devotion, teamwork, tradition, family and the importance of the arts and entertainment in society. There is also scope to integrate historical themes because of the time period outlined, geographical themes as a result of the circus’s nomadic nature, and even language skills (especially Italian) as the circus employs international talents.

Over the course of six one-hour sessions, participants develop skills using tableaux (or freeze frames), essence machine, improvisation, physical theatre, soundscaping, small- and whole group work, and hot seating, in addition to participation with Teacher-in-Role. The scheme also encourages students’ development of enquiry, creativity, negotiation, empathy, reflection, problem solving and group discussion as they explore the key questions/themes in each session. Read less...

One-off workshop: The Great Egg Detective

One-off workshop: The Great Egg Detective

This one-off workshop helps build both general and character-based improvisational skills. The drama leader, in-role as the Police Chief, reopens the case of Humpty Dumpty and asks the young �detectives� to re-enact the event to discover what truly happened. Read less...

Key Stage 3

Exploration of Shakespeare

Author: Vickie Smith

Exploration of Shakespeare

The aim of this scheme of work is to allow students to explore several different Shakespeare plays in an interesting and practical way to help take the fear out of his work. It is ideal for Year 7 and Year 8 students. By the end of the scheme the students will understand how Shakespeare should be explored practically, and how conventions can be used to enhance the language. The success criteria for the work is adapted from Drama in Schools and is set at Level 5. Read less...

Stage combat

Author: Naomi Holcombe

Stage combat

This scheme of work for KS3 aims to teach students an understanding of the skills and techniques behind stage combat and to enable them to go on to develop these into on-stage routines.

It is organised into six one-hour lessons, delivered over a period of six weeks.

Learning objectives
By the end of the scheme students will have gained the following knowledge/skills:
- Awareness of a range of stage combat moves
- Understanding of the safety aspects and skills involved
- Ability to link moves together to form short sequences
- Ability to choose music to complement action
- Ability to develop narrative.
- Assessment
- Peer assessment
- Video recording of their completed pieces Read less...

The Seven Ages of Man

Author: Katherine Noble

The Seven Ages of Man

This scheme of work explores the monologue ‘The Seven Ages of Man’ spoken by Jaques in the play As You Like It by William Shakespeare (Act 2, scene 7, lines 139–166).

The purpose of the scheme is for students to understand the monologue and learn drama strategies to explore it, and demonstrate understanding of it to an audience.

It is intended to be delivered to KS3. Students will devise and perform their own play inspired by the monologue using the skills taught in the scheme of work. Read less...

Key Stage 5

Using postmodernism in drama and theatre making

Author: David Porter

Using postmodernism in drama and theatre making

We live in an increasingly ‘cross-genre’ environment where things are mixed, sampled and mashed up. History, time, roles, arts, technology and our cultural and social contexts are in flux. Postmodernism expresses many of the ways in which this is happening.

As the reformed A levels come on stream, postmodernism may appear to have little place except in BTECs. However, performing arts in general and drama in particular require knowledge and understanding of wider contexts, reinterpretations, devising and study of texts from different periods. Exploring postmodernism is an excellent way to open up a world of artistic interest, exploration, experiment and mash-ups for students who are 16 and over.

Although different in details, the Drama and Theatre A level specifications offered for teaching from 2016 (first exam in 2018) are similar in intention and breadth of study. All require exploration of some predetermined and some centre-chosen texts, a variety of leading practitioners, and devising and re interpretations. Using postmodernism broadens students’ viewpoints, ideas and practical experiences of using art forms to express material.

Exam preparation aside, this scheme serves as an effective introduction/taster to performing arts in general and theatre/drama in particular. Read less...

Yerma by Federico Garcia Lorca

Author: Mat Walters

Yerma by Federico Garcia Lorca

This scheme of work for use with KS5 looks at introducing the play Yerma, focusing on key themes in the play, and building acting and directing strategies for Act 1, scene 1.

Yerma is a tragedy and clearly reflects Lorca’s interest in challenging the expectations of naturalistic theatre. The performing style adopted should reflect these aspects clearly; so should the technical elements and colour palette for the costumes, as should the terms used to describe approaches to it in written work. There is also a clear element of surrealist influence over the play, and the language is deeply poetic, symbolic and full of imagery. Song and choreographed movement also play central roles in bringing the play to life. Even those scenes which seem the most potentially naturalistic are full of stage directions and poetic imagery which indicate a heightened, almost stylised, acting style.

Yerma premiered in 1934 and in it, once again, Lorca took the local and specific and gave them a universal quality, allowing the play to become an indictment of the trappings of social convention, ideas that run through all of his work. At the centre of the play is a woman driven to madness and murder by her desire for a child, in order that she can fulfil that which is expected of her. The play hints at her not being responsible for the lack of a child, but that it is, in fact, her husband Juan who is infertile. The last line of the play ‘I’ve murdered my child,’ as Yerma stands over her husband, who she has just strangled with a strength born from hysteria and despair (or perhaps could the scene be staged so that Juan allows her to kill him?), emphasises the constant symbolic nature of the actions and words. It is her husband whom she has killed, and yet, so consumed is she by her sense of being incomplete, the murder is of her role as a mother: her rightful role which has been denied her.

Yerma is perhaps the most immediately accessible of Lorca’s plays, but it has many challenges, especially with regard to focusing on an extract of it when considering the role of a director and an actor. Central to success in dealing with an extract is an appreciation of the heightened acting style which emphasises the poetic nature of the language and the conflicting passions that the characters face. The aim of this scheme of work is to remind students of the need for appropriate theatrical vocabulary, to highlight the importance of the acting style, to understand and begin to convey the subtext evident in the relationships and to highlight some central themes of the play and to consider how they could be made evident during the opening sections of Act 1. The three sections of the opening scene, between Yerma and her husband Juan, then the interaction between Yerma and her newly-pregnant friend Maria, and then finally her scene with Victor, will be considered from the point of view of a director, and simple methods to convey meaning to the audience will be addressed. Students must show an understanding of what their given extract foreshadows later in the play, so that their directorial ideas are relevant and are apt for the development of the plot.

Yerma is a highly atmospheric play, and that sense of tension and how it differs in each section of the opening scene of the play, needs to be carefully addressed. Once again Lorca chooses to set his action in a close-knit, highly ordered community, where social roles are clearly defined and must not be deviated from, so Yerma as a character becomes a symbol herself of the misery that such a strict sense of social expectation can cause. Read less...

Issue 62 (Autumn Term 2 - 15/16)

Key Stage 2

They don't do that any more

Author: David Porter

They don't do that any more

We need some understanding of the past to make sense of the present and to cope with the future. Everything happening now is, in asense, because of what happened before. The present is connected to both past and future.

This scheme suggests a number of historical ideas, facts and stories as stimulus to create group drama and encourages students to respond and develop their own understanding of things in history that people don?t do any more. Despite today?s technology people are still human. Read less...

Key Stage 3

Aesop's Fables

Author: Alicia Pope

Aesop's Fables

This scheme of work for KS3 students involves storytelling and character work suitable for all stages of KS3. Many of theactivities within the scheme can be extended in a number of ways to push older students and encourage them into devising their own work based thematically on the stories. It begins to explore techniques such as ensemble work and choral voice, working on and off the text and giving students the opportunity to explore their own ideas. Lots of the work can lend itself to a variety of the fables, so the scheme could be used for a number of lessons or a whole term. Read less...

Mime

Author: Katherine Noble

Mime

This scheme of work explores the use of mime, slapstick and physical theatre as well as learning lazzi routines from commedia dell’arte. The purpose of the scheme is for students to learn how to communicate without dialogue as well as focus on physical comedy.

It is intended to be delivered to KS3 and KS4, the overall objective being that students will have a basic knowledge of theatre and film history from the physical comedy genre. Students will devise and perform their own comedy play using the skills taught from the scheme of work. Read less...

Key Stage 4

Developing physical theatre

Author: Gail Deal

Developing physical theatre

This unit is worth 10 credits. The unit specification is on the Edexcel website. The detail included in the scheme below is taken from the specification. In the unit specification there are ideas for how to deliver the unit and what assignments could be set. There are examples in the main text book: BTEC Level 3 Performing
Arts written by Sally Jewers, Carolyn Carnaghan and Paul Webster and published by Pearson Education Limited (2010).

It takes 60 Guided Learning Hours to deliver. The unit could be delivered over
one term on three/four lessons a week depending on staffing and length of lessons. This scheme is run on four sessions of 65 minutes per week, making a weekly total of 4 hours 20 minutes for 14 weeks. The performances take place in the last week. Some time is set aside both in the lesson and at home or in study periods for learners to write in their log books. This unit is taught in the Autumn Term of Year One on the Edexcel BTEC Advanced Subsidiary or Certificate courses. Read less...

Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

Author: Vickie Smith

Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

This scheme of work can be used with the Drama and Theatre Studies specification for GCSE Unit 2, but can also be adapted to be used with other specifications for GCSE, or as a foundation into the GCSE. I have included some introduction lessons and then assessment lessons which will cover the 6 hours required for the exam.
The play is ideal for an all-girls class as it features predominately female roles. However, if you are in a mixed class, you could experiment with what happens if you turn the girls into boys or the Rosie or Jane characters into male characters. Read less...

Key Stage 5

Berkoff: An exploration of the practitioner, Total Theatre and his text

Author: Rhianna Elsden

Berkoff: An exploration of the practitioner, Total Theatre and his text

This scheme uses several of Berkoff’s texts and adaptations to explore his technique and Total Theatre. This would fulfil many different A level specifications (both current and forthcoming) that require the exploration of a practitioner. Several of his texts and monologues are used within the scheme, which could also be of benefit to students who would enjoy and do well in physical and non-naturalistic roles for exam purposes. Read less...

Issue 61 (Autumn Term 1 - 15/16)

Key Stage 2

In a word . . . Goodbye

Author: David Porter

In a word . . . Goodbye

A single word can convey so much. In just one word, people can express love or hate and fill others with hope or despair, doubt or anger, light or darkness with every shade of meaning in between.
This scheme of work, using the theme of ?Goodbye?, aims to provide in seven lessons opportunities for collaborative story-making, role-play and characterisation and explores the need to think before we speak. It naturally links with English, personal development, current affairs and confidence-building activities.
Read less...

Key Stage 3

One-off workshop: Malala Yousafzai

Author: Rhianna Elsden

One-off workshop: Malala Yousafzai

This one-off workshop will develop students’ understanding of Malala Yousafzai using the drama medium and elements, and exploratory strategies. The lesson will enable students to make connections between drama practical work and wider social, cultural, historical and political contexts. It runs as a lesson with a series of outcomes and one final larger end piece. It can easily be adapted to extend beyond one lesson. Read less...

Persuasion

Author: Katherine Noble

Persuasion

This scheme of work explores the use of persuasion and manipulation of advertising in the medium of film. Students will briefly explore other areas where manipulation and persuasion are found; use of language and images; camera shots and angles; storyboard and script.
This scheme is intended to be delivered to KS3 and KS4, and could be adapted as a media unit of work. The overall objective is to give students a greater understanding of how persuasion and manipulation work, and to produce their own complete advertisement lasting 30 seconds. Read less...

Victim

Author: David Porter

Victim

Drama on stage or screen, or in the school drama studio, is created when there are clashes of personalities, agendas, beliefs, ambitions and circumstances. Drama needs all sorts of people from hero to villain, clown to victim.
This is the second in an occasional series of schemes to develop performance skills and plot-building through characterisation. The first was Every Drama Needs ... a Villain (See Teaching Drama, Spring Term, 2014).
This scheme suggests a range of scenarios where the victim character can be explored and developed exposing his/her impact on others so they too can be built up as characters in a credible drama, perhaps with a message. Read less...

Key Stage 4

Verbatim theatre

Author: Alison Warren

Verbatim theatre

Verbatim theatre has become fashionable lately with Alecky Blythe?s National Theatre hit London Road having been turned into a film. I first encountered it when some of our A level Theatre Studies students chose David Hare?s The Permanent Way as the script for their exam performance piece, although it has been a theatre form since the 1940s and some would argue that its origins go back even further that.
The term ?verbatim? refers to the origins of the play; the words of real people are recorded or transcribed during an interview or research process. These are then edited to create a performance where the actors take on the roles of the real individuals and use only their words.
When I?ve explored this with students, their response is enthusiastic and extremely positive. I think there are two reasons for this. First, the pressure to create dialogue that sounds realistic and meaningful is removed as someone else has done this work; all the students have to do is to bring to bear on the words their theatrical skills. Secondly, the students are capable of taking great responsibility for the real words of real people. They acknowledge and understand the fact that this is the testimony of real people in real situations and that feels significant and special to them.
Please note I have divided the scheme into sessions, not lessons. Most of these ?sessions? (after Session 1) will probably take a week of lessons to complete but you should use your own judgement on that, of course. Read less...

Key Stage 5

Physical theatre and ways to begin devising inspired by Frantic Assembly

Author: Rhianna Elsden

Physical theatre and ways to begin devising inspired by Frantic Assembly

What is physical theatre? How can students be encouraged to work more physically, embracing different practitioner�s approaches, as well as discovering their own physical theatrical language? How can existing or devised text be combined with highly physical theatre styles? These questions are addressed in this scheme which works best for KS5. While it is intended for drama students, students with dance skills will also benefit. Frantic Assembly�s ideas and exercises are embedded throughout. This scheme could therefore be useful to students as an introduction to Frantic as inspirational theatre practitioners, or for devising their own work. The lessons could lead to work on an extended piece or remain as a series of workshops with smaller performance outcomes. Read less...

Too Much Punch for Judy by Mark Wheeller

Author: Alicia Pope

Too Much Punch for Judy by Mark Wheeller

Too Much Punch for Judy is a documentary-style play based on real-life events. It tells the story of a young girl who kills her sister in a drink-drive incident. Ten years later, ?Judy? goes on to kill someone else in a road collision, this time with not only alcohol but cannabis in her system. The main aim of this scheme of work is to use both on- and off-text exploration to generate ideas for students? devised work. However, if students are using this text for a scripted project, this scheme would be very useful to guide them through the play and offer ideas for effective drama techniques. Read less...

Issue 60 (Summer Term 2 - 14/15)

Key Stage 2

The box

Author: David Porter

The box

A closed or empty box can conjure up a host of images, ideas and thoughts. Boxes made of different materials, housing all sorts of unexpected things. Why? When? Who? and Where? are questions asked by this simple prop, with creative drama supplying possible answers. Using physicality, dialogue and some characterisation development, students can let their imaginations run free about any old box.

This scheme comprises seven short lessons designed to experiment with making drama from a real or imagined prop and help students to work collaboratively and creatively. Read less...

Key Stage 3

One-off workshop: the camera never lies

Author: David Porter

One-off workshop: the camera never lies

It used to be true that the camera never lied – a photograph was proof that the things in it were there. Nowadays, of course, it’s no such thing. Pictures can be manipulated to make anything seem possible. This one-off workshop explores the effect of contemporary technology on people. Read less...

Witches

Author: Katherine Noble

Witches

This scheme of work explores fear and the persecution of ‘innocents’. The Crucible (film), the McCarthy hearings, background information on the Salem Witch Trials, as well as modern instances referring to ‘persecution’, are used. The material is given as a stimulus to act as a thought provoker only. It is intended to be delivered to the higher levels of KS3 and can used as a GCSE unit for KS4. The overall objective of the scheme is that students can explore social and cultural issues in a historical and modern context. Read less...

Key Stage 4

Hillsborough

Author: Rhianna Elsden

Hillsborough

These activities, using the Hillsborough tragedy as stimuli, can form two or three lessons. It can work for Year 9, but the subject matter is perhaps more suited to GCSE groups. At KS3 or KS4, use of this scheme will develop both students'' Drama skills and their wider social skills, while extending their understanding of a socially and historically important event.

The tragedy is of continued relevance and is highly sensitive, therefore anyone leading these activities should ensure they know their group and establish clear boundaries for the sharing of ideas and practical work. The final activity offers a challenging and exciting opportunity to produce a performance response featuring everyone in the class at the same time. The activities afford both practical and discussion opportunities for the students and can work effectively for mixed or setted ability teaching. Read less...

National Subsidiary Diploma in Performing Arts

Author: Gail Deal

National Subsidiary Diploma in Performing Arts

This scheme of work suggests six units to opt for in the BTEC National Subsidiary Diploma in Performing Arts and gives some suggestions of what assignments might cover. It gives information on assessment and grading, content and learning outcomes for some of the six units. It also signposts where to find information on the Edexcel website.

This qualification helps learners acquire knowledge, understanding and skills in order to progress in their chosen career. There are core units and optional units which make the course easy to adapt to the needs of your learners. Read less...

War

Author: Vickie Smith

War

This scheme of work can be used with the Drama and Theatre Studies Specification GCSE – Unit 1. The scheme is ready to be used as a 6-hour exam and is structured into four two-part sessions. (This is the six hours practical, and allows for two hours for notes which I have included in the scheme; I do this as a whole day exam with breaks every two hours.) It meets the criteria for the exam, allowing students to use a variety of explorative strategies, drama mediums and elements of drama in the exploration of a range of the stimuli based on the theme of war. Read less...

Key Stage 5

The Beauty Queen of Leenane by Martin McDonagh

Author: Alicia Pope

The Beauty Queen of Leenane by Martin McDonagh

The Beauty Queen of Leenane is a powerful reflection on relationships and mental health. It focuses on the demanding relationship between Maureen and her elderly mother Mag, while raising questions about the lengths people are sometimes driven to. As an audience we swing wildly between the two protagonists, feeling empathy and horror in equal measure. The text offers a great deal for students in terms of performance. It will present challenges, but it also lends itself to a wide range of interpretations, allowing students to experiment with their skills.

This scheme of work is primarily designed to offer activities to develop students’ understanding of the text as well as providing ideas for performance. The activities can all be used after a group has read the text; however, as the text twists and turns, it would also be useful to read the text and use each activity as a small section of text is read. Read less...

Issue 59 (Summer Term 1 - 14/15)

Key Stage 2

The Highwayman: a narrative poem explored through drama

Author: Helen Day

The Highwayman: a narrative poem explored through drama

Alfred Noyes’ ‘The Highwayman’ is a classic poem, providing fantastic source material for drama work. Teaching poetry to KS2 pupils is not always easy, and the wonderful hook of this piece is the powerful story. Read less...

Key Stage 3

One-off workshop: Great expectations

Author: David Porter

One-off workshop: Great expectations

This one-off workshop helps character-building by exploring how people often look forward to things only to be disappointed by reality. Such let-downs are supposed to be character-building in life, and certainly are in drama, where the consequences can be very dramatic. Read less...

Teechers by John Godber

Author: Katherine Noble

Teechers by John Godber

This scheme of work explores the play Teechers by John Godber. It is intended to be delivered to KS3 and KS4. The overall objective is to enable students to explore a contemporary play in a social and cultural context, to learn and use Drama strategies, mediums and elements and to reach the higher scale of the KS3 drama objectives. Read less...

The 7/7 bombings

Author: Rhianna Elsden

The 7/7 bombings

These activities using the 7/7 London bombings as a stimuli can form two lessons, or, with the extension activities, a longer scheme. It can work for Year 9, or for GCSE groups. At KS3 or KS4, use of this scheme will develop both students’ Drama skills and their wider social skills while extending their understanding of a socially and historically important event.

This scheme provides an opportunity to address Islamophobia. This can be highly sensitive and therefore anyone leading these activities should ensure they know their group and establish clear boundaries for the sharing of ideas and practical work. It can work very well with cross-curricular links to History, RE and PSHE. The activities afford both practical and discussion opportunities for the students and can work effectively for mixed or setted ability teaching. Read less...

Key Stage 4

Faction: how to combine fact and fiction to make drama

Author: David Porter

Faction: how to combine fact and fiction to make drama

In a part-factual, perhaps historical story, facts are supplemented with a certain amount of fiction. Who said what, what occurred behind the facts? The mixture is called ‘faction’ and is necessary to make drama work. The case of Ruth Ellis, the last woman in England to be hanged, offers a retelling of events to shed light on the people and their actions and explore dramatic possibilities. Read less...

Key Stage 5

Childhood

Author: Alicia Pope

Childhood

This scheme of work focuses on plays that explore the theme of childhood. It focuses on Blue Remembered Hills, Blood Brothers, Gum and Goo and Swallows and Amazons, looking at how children are portrayed in different scripts and scenarios. The scheme uses on and off-text work involving a variety of skills and ideas for devised and scripted work. This scheme can be used as an introduction to scripted work or a starting point for students’ own devised work. Read less...

Fewer Emergencies by Martin Crimp

Author: Vickie Smith

Fewer Emergencies by Martin Crimp

This scheme of work of work can be used with the Drama and Theatre Studies Specification GCE – Unit 1. I have included an introduction lesson and then assessment lessons which cover all elements except the Practitioner element. I would also include a series of exploration lessons that allow the students just to play around with the play and the different elements.

While I have labelled each lesson under a specific element, it will often be the case that a session will cover more than one element, for example almost every activity they explore could also cover interpretation. Read less...

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