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Music Teacher magazine is the essential meeting point and resource for music education practitioners.

Whether you teach class music, or are a peripatetic/private instrumental teacher, Music Teacher will provide you with invaluable ideas for your teaching, with substantial online lesson materials and a range of practical features. Packed with reviews, news, comment and debate, as well as the latest jobs, professional development opportunities and fantastic special offers, Music Teacher is all you need to teach music.



Teaching Materials 2015

Music Pages
Music Teacher Guide about Music and Dyslexia

Latest News

Government 'lets children down' in music 

10 December 2014

Leading figures in the music industry say the Government has broken its promise to give every child in Britain the opportunity to learn a musical instrument.  


Julian Lloyd Webber, Sting, Alison Balsom and the heads of the Royal College of Music and Royal Philharmonic Orchestra are among the signatories to a letter to the  Telegraph demanding that all children have the chance of learning to play an instrument. They want Ofsted rules to be changed so that a school cannot be rated 'good' or 'outstanding' unless it offers good or outstanding music provision.   

The Government unveiled its National Plan for Music in 2011, claiming it would ‘enable every child to have the chance to learn to play a musical instrument for at least a term, ideally a year’.  

However, the funding model has become a postcode lottery, and access to instruments is ‘simply out of reach’ for a great number of children, according to James Rhodes, concert pianist and lead signatory to the letter published in the Telegraph on 23rd November.  

Mr. Rhodes visited schools for a recent Channel 4 series, Don't Stop The Music, and found children using dustbin lids and yoghurt pots in place of real instruments. He said headteachers feel under pressure to meet targets for English and maths, and music lessons often become the lowest priority  

‘I don't think anyone would say music doesn't deserve to be studied. But if you are a headteacher in a school where you know you will live or die by ticking Ofsted boxes on literacy and numeracy, that is all you're going to focus on’.  

‘We have not moved on from the idea that music is a privilege and a luxury if you have the time and the budget. But learning to play an instrument gives you self-esteem, discipline, confidence. In what other field ... when there's an app for everything, and everything is instant, do you have  the chance for slow, incremental, messy improvement?’.  

Julian Lloyd Webber initially lent his name to the National Plan for Music but said it had failed to deliver.  ‘The biggest frustration of all to me is the idea that it's an 'either/or' situation. It's not a case of, 'If my child learns to play the cello they are not going to learn their maths as well'. In fact, it's the reverse. Having access to music is a help, not a hindrance. It takes discipline to learn an instrument - it is a complex thing to do.’  T

he Department of Education declined to supply any information on how many schools have met its 2011 target. 

Music hub and Arts Council host minister’s visit

9 December 2014

Arts Council and the North East London music education hub recently hosted a visit from Nick Gibb, Minister of State at the Department for Education (DfE). The visit took place at Redbridge Primary School where he, and colleagues from the  (DfE) observed a Year 4 Whole Class Ensemble Teaching (WCET) beginner recorder class and a Year 6 WCET flute continuation class. 


After touring the school and talking to teaching staff and pupils, the minister was accompanied to the John Savage Centre in Hainault where he met staff and instrument repair technicians from the Instrument Centre, and observed a kindergarten class with toddlers, parents and carers. Mr Gibb was receptive and enthusiastic throughout, and seemed particularly impressed with the quality of music education on offer, and the schools’ commitment to the arts. He was also impressed with approaches to raising attainment in reading and maths, with the expertise within the hub itself, and with the hub’s valuable supportive role across two outer London boroughs. 

National Learn to Play Day 2015

8 December 2014

The event will be UK-wide and will once again offer the general public the chance to have a free “taster” lesson on a musical instrument. In 2014, 117 venues put on events ranging from Music Shops to Music Services and even Churches! People who have never played and people who used to play all came on the day to try an instrument to gain expert advice on next steps on playing an instrument. Over 10,000 free lessons were given in 2014 with over a third of people going on to continue their musical journey.  


For 2015, the charity wants to fully involve any Music Hub, Music Service or community music project that is interested in running a stand-alone event or partner with an existing one. Music for All Patron, Jools Holland commented ‘I am delighted to lend my support to the National Learn to Play Day and help MFA in their quest to inspire more people to participate in music making.’  

If would like more information about the event, go to www.learntoplayday.com where you can see a short video that includes Portsmouth Music Service or contact mfa@mia.org.uk 

 Swinging Hubs 

5 December 2014

On 22 November Bournemouth & Poole (SoundStorm), Bromley, East Renfrewshire, Manchester (One Education Music), Oxfordshire, Hampshire and Southampton were the centre of attention at a celebration of their commitment to jazz education at an EFG London Jazz Festival concert in the Queen Elizabeth Hall. After the presentation of Diplomas under the Jazz Services’ Will Michael Jazz Education Awards scheme, supported by the Worshipful Company of Musicians and Serious, the celebrations were brought to a head by the Royal Academ of Music Big Band playing the music of and featuring Nikki Iles. 


The Awards are a means of according national recognition to those Hubs, Music Services and Education Authorities which demonstrate an outstanding commitment to jazz education. 

Young musicians…get your music heard 

4 December 2014


Time is running out for young musicians wanting to perform at the world’s largest youth music festival – entries must be in by 8 December. The Regional Festival Series, sponsored by ABRSM, the exam board of the Royal Schools of Music, runs between February and March in 50 venues across the UK.  National youth music organisation Music for Youth delivers a season of events which young people, and their music teachers and leaders can get involved, including the 5-day MFY National Festival in Birmingham (7-11 July) and the spectacular Schools Prom at the Royal Albert Hall in November. The Regional Festival Series features 40,000 young participants performing all over the country, providing a unique opportunity for around 1,500 groups to perform to new audiences, listen to other groups from their area and get valuable feedback from the team of professional musicians who will help them to progress their musical talents.

This free event is open to groups of two or more who are 21 and under, playing (or singing) any genre of music to any standard.

To join over 40,000 young musicians in the world’s largest youth music festival, enter your group for free at mfy.org.uk/regional. It takes just 10 minutes to sign up your group to a festival performance in February or March, or you can submit a recorded entry by Wednesday 4 March 2015."


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