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Whether you teach class music, or are a peripatetic/private instrumental teacher, Music Teacher will provide you with invaluable ideas for your teaching, with substantial online lesson materials and a range of practical features. Packed with reviews, news, comment and debate, as well as the latest jobs, professional development opportunities and fantastic special offers, Music Teacher is all you need to teach music.



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Teaching Materials 2015

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Latest News

Arts education debated in BBC panel show

2 March 2015

The importance of education in the battle against elitism in the arts was among the issues debated during the BBC’s Arts Question Time programme on Sunday.

Six panellists joined an audience of arts lovers and presenter Kirsty Wark (pictured) at the Radio Theatre in Broadcasting House, London, for the Question Time-style debate, which was broadcast on BBC Four.

To a question from an audience member about the danger of careers in the arts being available only to the privileged and wealthy, novelist Jeanette Winterson responded: ‘It starts with education, and it has to. We have to make kids in schools feel that art is for them.

‘Every child on this planet that ever was, across time, is born creative,’ added the author of Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit. ‘They’ll paint a picture and stick it on the fridge; they’ll make a kingdom out of pots and pans; they’ll do a little dance; they’ll tell a story. That’s hard wired, it’s our creative DNA, and we knock it out of them. We say, that’s not for you, it’s elitist, it’s only for people with money. And it’s absolutely false.’

Wark made reference to a report published in February by the Warwick Commission on the Future of Cultural Value, which showed a marked decline in the number of children taking arts subjects at GCSE.

Artist Cornelia Parker said: ‘My daughter is 13 and starting to think a about her GCSEs at the Camden School for Girls. I did a lecture there and a lot of the students were saying, I’m not going to do A-level art because it’s going to bring our school down, it’s not going to be useful as an A-level.’ She added that she felt arts subjects were being ‘demoted’.

The other panellists were Rupert Goold, artistic director of the Almeida Theatre in London; Jamal Edwards, founder of youth culture channel SBTV; Charles Saumarez Smith, chief executive of the Royal Academy of Arts; and Yancey Strickler, co-founder of crowdfunding website Kickstarter.

More 'evidence' to support the benefits of music education

2 March 2015

A report on the benefits of music education has produced ‘compelling evidence’ that learning music can help children develop a wide range of other skills, according to its author.

The Power of Music: a Research Synthesis of the Impact of Actively Making Music on the Intellectual, Social and Personal Development of Children and Young People was produced by Susan Hallam for the Music Education Council (MEC) and published by the International Music Education Research Centre (iMerc). It brings together research evidence that has accrued over recent years, supporting the argument that every child and young person should have access to quality music making opportunities, and calls for schools to ensure that all pupils receive a thorough and broad-ranging music education.

Hallam said: ‘The research shows there is compelling evidence of the benefits of music education on a wide range of skills: listening skills, which support the development of language skills, awareness of phonics and enhanced literacy; spatial reasoning, which supports the development of some mathematical skills; and, where musical activities involve working in groups, a wide range of personal and social skills which also serve to enhance overall academic attainment even when measures of intelligence are taken into account.’

The benefits were shown to be greatest when musical activities started early and continued over a long period of time. It was also noted that the teaching of music had to be of high quality for the benefits to emerge.

Winners of Expo Fanfare competition revealed

19 February 2015

Daniel Hall
Daniel Hall

Garrett Norton
Garrett Norton

Garrett Norton and Daniel Hall are the winners of our inaugural Fanfare Composition Competition and their pieces will be performed at the Music Education Expo on 13 March.

Students in two categories were asked to submit a fanfare for up to eight instruments, comprising up to four B flat trumpets and up to four B flat tenor trombones. We received some really fantastic entries, and the judges had a tricky time picking our two winners. Daniel Hall was the winner in the 18 and under section. Hall, 18, impressed the judges with his ‘sophisticated approach to harmonic rhythm and musical gesture’. Garrett Norton, 13, won the 16 and under group. The judges said: ‘At just 13 years of age, Garrett Norton has produced a sparkling flourish that balances an intuitive simplicity with a satisfyingly rich texture.’

Premieres of both pieces will be given on the second day of the Music Education Expo, which takes place at Barbican Exhibition Hall 2. The performances will take place on the balcony at 12.15pm.

The fanfares will be performed by young musicians from Music for Youth, and they will play on plastic instruments provided by Korg.


BBC Proms Inspire Young Composers’ Competition

23 January 2015

The BBC has announced the opening of the BBC Proms Inspire Young Composers’ Competition. Now in its seventeenth year, this annual competition is a cornerstone of the BBC Proms’ ongoing Inspire Scheme, which offers a platform to young composers to develop their skills, share their ideas with like-minded composers and get their music heard. In 2014 Inspire worked with over 550 young musicians, commissioned nine new works and performed and broadcast the music of 17 young composers.  

The competition is open to students aged 12 to 18 years. Entries will be judged by a panel of music professionals, including composers Fraser Trainer, Judith Weir, and Anna Meredith. The winning pieces will be performed by professional musicians for the Proms Plus Inspire concert and will be broadcast on BBC Radio 3; the winners will then be commissioned by the BBC  for a further work.  

The deadline for entries is 21 May


University of Huddersfield receives Queen's Anniversary Prize

19 November 2015

The University of Huddersfield is to receive the Queen's Anniversary Prize for 'world-leading work to promote, produce and present contemporary music to an international audience'. 


The prizes are awarded biannually to higher education institutions which have made significant contributions to the intellectual, economic and cultural life of the nation and to society and individuals in Britain and overseas.

Winners receive a specially-cast medal naming the institution, a certificate signed by the Queen and the entitlement to display the logo of the Queen’s Anniversary Prize Scheme for the ensuing four years.

The university's application for the prize was based around the important role its contemporary music work plays in forging connections with local, national and international communities.

The supporting document stated: 'Wide-ranging impacts in culture, education and commercial applications have grown from investment in world-class facilities and staff, strategic partnerships with festivals and industry bodies, and pioneering international collaborations.

'New music inspired by the University’s leadership in this area has reached new audiences, developed generations of creative artists, and contributed to the vitality of cultural life in the UK and internationally, as well as to the social and economic well-being of the region. The University’s name has become synonymous with excellence in contemporary music-making, and its leaders are committed both to sustaining this distinctive legacy and to setting future trends.'

The application also drew attention to how the university's contemporary music projects forged international links and collaborations, attracting students and staff from overseas, and providing opportunities for young and emerging artists and scholars, and highlighted its role in founding and hosting the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework identified the university's research in music as 'internationally excellent' and 'world-leading'. Research into new music is coordinated by CeReNeM, a community of world-leading artists and scholars directed by Professor Liza Lim which brings interdisciplinary perspectives to research in contemporary composition, performance, music technology, improvisation and sonic media.

Vice-Chancellor Professor Bob Cryan said he was delighted by the award.  'There is no doubt that contemporary music research and performance is one of the jewels in our crown at the University of Huddersfield and the hard work that went into producing our submission for the Queen‘s Anniversary Prize has been amply rewarded.'

The prize will be presented on 25 February 2016 at Buckingham Palace. 

University of Huddersfield: Music


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