spml

Music Teacher magazine is the essential meeting point and resource for music education practitioners.

Whether you teach class music, or are a peripatetic/private instrumental teacher, Music Teacher will provide you with invaluable ideas for your teaching, with substantial online lesson materials and a range of practical features. Packed with reviews, news, comment and debate, as well as the latest jobs, professional development opportunities and fantastic special offers, Music Teacher is all you need to teach music.



estateachers mt

Music Pages
Music Teacher Guide about Music and Dyslexia

Latest News

Recruiting opens for Glyndebourne Academy

22 December 2014

In January 2015, Glyndebourne opens recruitment for Glyndebourne Academy   ​a new scheme​ for singers aged 16-26 with exceptional potential, whose circumstances, economic, social or geographic, have excluded them from the traditional route towards a  singing ​career. Glyndebourne Academy has evolved as Glyndebourne’s contribution towards breaking down barriers into the profession.   


Following recommendations from the 2008 ‘Singers of Tomorrow’ conference at the National Opera Studio, Mary King, Glyndebourne Vocal Talent Consultant and Glyndebourne Academy Artistic Director, worked with Glyndebourne’s former Head of Education, Katie Tearle, to create a training course for young talented amateur singers.  The Glyndebourne Academy pilot scheme took place in 2012. It provided a select number of young singers, several of whom were entirely new to opera, with seven days of intensive instruction in operatic vocal technique and performance. Academy sessions covered vocal coaching, training in movement and drama, language coaching, work on notational literacy, discussion sessions about vocal types, career considerations, support networks and the range of skills development needed for an operatic career. 

Throughout the winter of 2012, each singer received continued support in the form of advice and resources concerning how he or she could continue their operatic development until such time as they were able to attend music college or other formal training.  The 2015 course follows on from the pilot scheme and successful applicants will enjoy a residential week, trips to the Festival and a performance opportunity of their own at Glyndebourne.  Recruitment for the 2015 Glyndebourne Academy  training course opens in January 2015.  F

or further details see the Glyndebourne Academy  website http://glyndebourne.com/academy

Student composer for ENO children’s opera

19 December 2014

A PhD student at Birmingham Conservatoire has composed the score for English National Opera’s first ever show for children this December. ‘The Way Back Home’ is an opera adaptation of Oliver Jeffer’s children’s book of the same name, which follows the journey of a boy who crash lands on the moon and comes face to face with a stranded Martian.  


Joanna Lee who composed the opera’s score, has been described by the Guardian as a “considerable talent, capable of creating vivid musical images’.  Her previous compositions have been shortlisted for a British Composer Award and an Arts Foundation Opera Composition Award. Suitable for children aged between five and eight years old, The Way Back Home runs for 40 minutes and has been created by Katie Mitchell and Vicki Mortimer, the pair behind the hit stage adaptation of Dr Seuss’s ‘The Cat in the Hat’.  Joanna sees it as ‘ a wonderful project to bring contemporary opera to a young audience, something which seems vital to inspire future generations of musicians and ensure the longevity of this genre’.  

Professor Martin Fautley, Director of the Centre for Research Education at Birmingham City University, said: ‘Music education is a vital part of the education of young people. We know that the UK is a world leader in the creative economy and equipping our young people to play a part in this is vital for our future development. This venture with the English National Opera offers children an exciting opening into the world of serious music, as well as sparking their creative imaginations’.           

 More information at: www.eno.org/waybackhome

New Faces at Royal Welsh College

18 December 2014

The Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama (RWCMD) report that the UK’s most virtuosic percussion duo, O Duo will be joining their teaching staff, with percussion guru Kevin Hathway as inaugural Ev-entz chair of percussion.  The percussion department at RWCMD offers performance opportunities embracing all musical styles. The course of study enables each student to work with leading professionals of international standing, creating versatile and employable future professionals. As part of the ongoing development of the College’s facilities, percussion practice space and resources have recently been enhanced with a large rehearsal suite, three purpose-built practice booths and a variety of new instruments.  


The College has excellent links with professional percussion artists both locally and internationally, with masterclasses punctuating the academic year and students receiving one to one tuition and specialist advice throughout their course from acclaimed professionals. Musicians with locally based orchestras WNO and BBC NOW provide tuition and mentoring support to students and offer unique access to rehearsals.  

Head of Percussion Kevin Price said, ‘Percussionists are the unsung heroes of the music world. Their chosen specialism means they not only need expertise in a huge array of tuned and un-tuned percussion instruments and timpani, but also the ability to access and appraise instruments according to the requirements of each score, and then to carry and set up everything well in advance of each rehearsal or performance. The ensembles at RWCMD which include percussionists is varied and diverse and includes six orchestras, two brass bands, a wind orchestra, brass ensembles and a specialist percussion ensemble  – all requiring the commitment and expertise of specialist percussion students and tutors’. 

El Sistema - a new publication polarises the music education community

17 December 2014

A storm of words has erupted following the publication of ‘El Sistema: Orchestrating Venezuela's Youth’ (OUP). Geoff Baker, a Reader in the music department at Royal Holloway, University of London, wrote the book following extensive travel and research in Venezuela.  


The reaction to this book has deeply polarised the music education community and there have been heated discussions on many blogs and websites both supporting and rejecting Baker’s findings.  A central thesis of the book is that El Sistema has become an institution serving the middle classes, rather than those less fortunate. In an opinion piece, published in the Guardian he begins:  “Far from the shining example of how classical music can change vulnerable young lives many claim it to be, Venezuela’s El Sistema fails the country’s most deprived children”  

There are also allegations of sexual abuse which have been picked up by pianist Ian Pace in his blog "Geoff Baker on El Sistema: sexual and other abuse in an authoritarian, hierarchical, archaic music culture"  

The author does point out that these allegations only refer to the situation he perceives in Venezuela and do not necessarily imply criticism of Sistema inspired initiatives in other countries. 

Baker is organising a conference for those who want to find out more and engage in the debate. The event, El Sistema and the Alternatives: Social Action through Music in Critical Perspective, will take place in the Senate House, University of London on 24 April 2015.              

Darren Henley appointed as chief executive of Arts Council England

16 December 2014

Darren Henley, managing director of Classic FM and the godfather of the National Plan for Music Education has been appointed chief executive of Arts Council England, replacing Alan Davey, who leaves after seven years in post.
Henley, who has chaired the Music Manifesto and is much in demand as a patron and board member, commented: 'Public investment has ensured the vitality and creativity of England’s cultural life. Arts Council England and the artists, performers and institutions we invest in contribute to who we are as a nation. I’m privileged to have the opportunity to lead this important organisation and support the extraordinary creativity and innovation that exists across the country in arts organisations, museums, galleries and libraries. 
'Alan Davey leaves quite a legacy. He made sure that the Arts Council enabled great work to happen. I want to build on that by working with our national chair and the chairs of our Area Councils to champion the importance of art and culture in so many aspects of our lives – personal, social and economic. Of course we must be responsive and adapt to the world around us, but the foundation stone is laid in terms of the Arts Council’s ten-year strategy. I look forward to working with the Arts Council teams around the country, particularly Althea Efunshile who is acting as chief Executive until I arrive. Together, all of us at Arts Council England will continue to strive towards achieving great art and culture for everyone, no matter who they are or where they are in England.'


Sign up to enews

Click here to sign up for free e-newsletters from Rhinegold magazines.



One Stage 2015

ism.org Music Educators

schools.cla

Music Education Prospectuses

The MU Teachers

abcd-convention

Customer Service

Our dedicated customer service team is here to help.

Please click for full details of how to contact us.

©2015 Rhinegold Publishing | Website by Semantic