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Masterclass and Company

Il Divo

Krzysztof Meyer’s Cyberiada receives rare staging in Poznań

28 May 2013, Poznań, Poland

'Cyberiada' at Poznan’s Teatr Wielki
'Cyberiada' at Poznan’s Teatr Wielki(Photo: K Zalewska)

Review by Karyl Charna Lynn

Based on short stories by the Polish writer Stanisław Lem, Cyberiada (The Cyberiad) is an allegorical dark comedy with serious overtones, dealing with the evils of totalitarianism, oppression, greed, deception, sexual addiction and the mysteries of life.

Using a story-within-a-story format, the opera fuses the science fiction idea of space travel with a pseudo-Medieval world populated by kings, queens, witches, knights and obedient subjects encased in identical multi-coloured boxes. A fiery red-haired inventor called Trull journeys from planet to planet building machines, which narrate three different allegorical tales symbolized by huge suspended masks.

Conceived as a Theatre of the Absurd by director Ran Arthur Braun and designer Justin Arienti, this precisely-executed production unfolded on a stage dominated by five huge batteries of percussion located on two levels. Each group incorporated 12 different instruments, which in turn produced 60 different types of sounds and noises (noise being as integral a part of the opera as the musical tones). The percussionists were dressed as astronauts and a parade of characters in over-the-top costumes acted with exaggerated and stilted mannerisms, parodying societal roles.

From breath-taking acrobatics, including two red-clad ballerinas pantomiming erotic dreams for King Zipperupus, to the finale in which Trull killed a clone of himself, the opera was simultaneously amusing and thought-provoking. Although composed during the 1960s, the final message touched on 21st century technology: nothing is eternal, not even machines. 

The music included serial, sonoristic and aleatoric techniques, resulting in a work with unconventional sounds and vocal lines almost devoid of melody, harmony or rhythm in the traditional sense. Instead, the action and feelings of the characters were expressed through a unique soundscape combining jazz, repeated chords, sound clusters and grotesque elements. Extensive sections of spoken dialogue were delivered melodically, ranging from rhythmical recitation to story-telling.

The singers, acrobats, dancers, chorus and orchestra of Poznań’s Teatr Wielki under maestro Krzysztof Słowiński did a superb job in keeping the complex elements of the work together, offering a worthwhile and admirable execution of this multi-faceted opera.

 

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