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Il Divo

Incoming director causes a stir at La Scala

6 May 2014, Milan, Italy

Alexander Pereira
Alexander Pereira(Photo: Luigi Caputo)

Six months before taking up his new position as general director of Milan’s Teatro alla Scala, Alexander Pereira has found himself at the centre of a controversy. He currently runs the Salzburg Festival and has been accused by Milan’s mayor of buying four Salzburg productions for La Scala without seeking approval from the Italian authorities.

Pereira presented his 2015-17 plans to the board of La Scala in late March; the purchase of the four productions was announced in the Austrian media on 1 April. ‘I learned about this affair from the papers, and immediately asked for a written report from Mr Pereira on what happened,’ explained Giuliano Pisapia, Milan’s mayor and the chairman of La Scala’s foundation. He added: ‘Should incorrect behaviors emerge, I will take the proper and due measures.’

Defending his position in an interview with the Turin-based newspaper La Stampa, Pereira said that the Salzburg Festival had spent €4.1m on the four productions, while La Scala will pay only €660,000. He said that he has chosen Salzburg’s best productions – Falstaff, Don Carlo, Die Meistersinger and Mozart’s Lucio Silla – and that they would be distributed over four years.

Elsewhere, Pereira has indicated that he wants to curtail the influence of La Scala’s loggionisti – a powerful minority of die-hard opera fans famed for their loud cat-calling, whose opinions can make or break the fortunes of artists appearing at the house. In mid-March he met the Friends of the Loggione association and is reported as telling them: ‘I have at my disposal the best [singers], but many do not want to perform on the stage at La Scala because they are intimidated, if not frightened to death. We can no longer allow this. Other opera houses are emerging and attacking our supremacy.’


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