Rhinegold Publishing

Les Talens Lyriques present rare Dauvergne opera in Versailles

9:45, 12th February 2013

Review by Alexandra Coghlan

The latest addition to Christophe Rousset’s cabinet of baroque curiosities, Antoine Dauvergne’s Hercule Mourant demonstrates the considerable influence (if not quite the genius) of Dauvergne’s teacher, Rameau.

A concert performance at the Opéra Royal in Versailles – the first since the work’s 18th century debut – was led by Veronique Gens, delivering a characteristically assured performance as Hercules’ neglected wife Dejanire. Andrew Foster-Williams rose to the challenge of singing his own death, though his dramatic conviction never quite caught up to his technical skill, and he had a considerable rival in Edwin Crossley-Mercer’s assertive Philoctete.

Unusual orchestral colourings and textural effects – an extended passage of string tremolos for Hercules’ ascension, muted bassoons paired with horns and strings for the sombre cloud that settles of the drama of Act V – give the work an interest it lacks elsewhere. One for the record collection perhaps, but not the opera stage.

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